Sufi Gathering (Halaqa) Augost 6, 20, 27 2011 [Ramandan Celebrations with Zikrullah Halaka]

Dear Friends, Hope this message finds you well. We gather together on the last Saturday of each month at The Rumi Center in Chicago, IL. Our doors are open to everyone and participation is Free! Therefore, all are invited and welcome to participate or just visit. The program includes praye

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Berat Kandil 2011 – Muslims across Globe to celebrate Berat Kandili

The five holy evenings on the Muslim calendar are called Kandil. During the Ottoman Empire Sultan Selim II of 16th century lit candles on the minarets of the mosques in order to announce these holy nights to the public. Since this calendar is calculated with the revolution of the moon around the e

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Sufi Gathering (Halaqa) July 16 2011

Dear Friends, Hope this message finds you well. We gather together on the last Saturday of each month at The Rumi Center in Chicago, IL. Our doors are open to everyone and participation is Free! Therefore, all are invited and welcome to participate or just visit. The program includes praye

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Tasawwuf is nothing but shari'at

Tasawwuf is nothing but shari’at

A problem that arises in the final couplet of "What is Tasawwuf ?" is that in equating Tasawwuf and shari'a, the poet brings up and then resolves an apparent tension between Tasawwuf and shari'a. Such a tension, however, exists only to the degree that one defines these two terms as being mutuall

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Taste [Dhawq]

Generally, one's spiritual proclivity or capacity is referred to by the term "taste" (dhawq). More specifically, Qushayri (d. 465/1072) hierarchically defined dhawq (tasting) along with shurb (drinking), and a less commonly used term riyy (being quenched). He stated, These terms denote the

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Wearers of Wool [Suf Pushan]

In Persian the literal meaning of the word sufi would be translated as "suf push"(wearer of wool). Hence the phrase in the poem "wearer of wool" is synonymous with Sufi's. It is generally agreed that the first Sufis were pious, ascetic Muslims who were called Sufis because they wore clothes of

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Ecstasy and “finding” [Wajd]

Literally, the word wajd means "finding," but for the Sufis it also means a moment of ecstasy in which one experiences an unveiling – and hence a "finding" - of some aspect of Allah Almighty's reality. Ruzbihan (d. 606/1209) defined wajd as, "The heart's perceiving the sweetness of contact w

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The Most Exalted Paradise [Khuld-i Barin]

Khuld is one of the many terms in Islamic languages for paradise, which can be spoken of as consisting of various degrees. The highest degree of paradise is sometimes referred to as khuld-i barin. Some writers of Sufi literature – such as the author of the poem about which we are remarking

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Certainty [Yaqin]

Certainty [Yaqin]

The classical Sufi doctrine of certainty involved three degrees: the knowledge of certainty ('ilm al-yaqin), the eye of certainty ('ayn al-yaqin), and the reality of certainty (haqq al-yaqin). Hujwiri (d. ca. 465/1072) discussed them in the following manner: "By 'ilm al-yaqin the Sufis me

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Contemplation [Fikr]

Contemplation (fikr or tafakkur) is an important aspect of the methodology of Islam in general and Tasawwuf in particular. In both the Qur'an al kareem and the sunnah, people are instructed by Allah to contemplate. In surat al-Nahl, Allah [Almighty is He] states; "And we have revealed t

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